G
o
h
a

N
a
s
r
e
d
d
i
n

H
o
c
a

M
u
l
l
a

N
a
s
r
e
d
d
i
n

Hoca and the Missing Meat (cont.)

On returning home that evening with a pleasantly gnawing appetite, Nasreddin Hoja asked if the cutlets were ready, and his wife, fearing his anger, resorted to a lie and told him that the cat had eaten them. Hoja at once caught hold of the cat, placed it on the kitchen scale and found that it weighed three pounds-the weight of the cutlets he had sent. Turning to his wife, "If this is the cat," he said, "where are the cutlets? And if what I hold in my hands are the cutlets, then where is the cat?"

Pregnant Pot

Nasreddin Hoja had a dishonest neighbour to whom he wanted to teach a lesson. One day he asked this neighbour for the loan of a cauldron. After a few days, he returned it with a small saucepan in it. When the man asked what it was all about, Nasreddin Hoja answered that his cauldron had given birth to a baby - a saucepan.

A short while later, Nasreddin Hoja again asked for the loan of the same cauldron. His neighbour, hoping for another "birth" gave it to the "imbecile" Hoja.

This time many days passed, and the cauldron had not been returned. Finally his neighbor decided to personally ask for his cauldron.. "Please accept my sincere condolonces," Nasreddin Hoja said with a sad face. "Your cauldron is dead!"

"What, my cauldron is dead!" cried out his amazed neighbour. "Whoever heard of a cauldron dying?"

"What an incredulous man you are!" Nasreddin Hoja replied. "What is there surprising in the death of a cauldron which could give birth to a pan?"

Hoja and the Sour Look

One evening Nasreddin Hoja returned home tired and out of sorts, longing for something to cheer him up, only to find that his wife wore the usual scowl on her face.

"What's wrong now?" Nasreddin Hoja cried. "It is my reward for toiling from morning till evening for your sake that you meet me with a face like that?"

"Oh! Our neighbor's little boy died " she said. "I went there to take part in the praying. I've just come back."

"I remember the same sour look on your face," Nasreddin Hoja retorted, "when you came back from weddings, too."

Hoja and Domestic Duties

Nasreddin Hoja was having a chat with his friends when someone came rushing up to him. "Run, Hoja, run!" he cried. "Your home is on fire!"

Hoja was not alarmed at all. "When I and my wife were married, "he said, "we agreed that while I would earn a living to support our home, the domestic affairs would be my wife's responsibility. Would you, therefore, be kind enough to find my wife and remind her of what I have just said."

Hoja's Wedding

It was Nasreddin Hoja's wedding day. As the marriage had been arranged, he had not yet seen his bride's face. After the ceremony, when she removed her veil, Nasreddin Hoja realized that she was a terribly ugly woman. He was stunned. While he could not say a word, his bride spoke coyly.

"I am at you command, my dear husband," she said. "Now tell me, in front of whom shall I remained veiled, and to whom shall I be allowed to show my face?"

"Show your face to anyone you like," Nasreddin Hoja groaned, "so long as you don't show it to me."

Tamurlane's Elephant

Tamurlane turns one of his male elephants over to the people of Akshehir ordering them to take care of it. In addition to wreaking havoc in the town, the elephant becoems a terrible burden on the people who are too poor to get decent food for themselves. A group of them visits Hoja with a request: (cont.)



Prev Next