NYPD Blue Summary/Review by Amanda Wilson aka Puedo01@aol.com

 

"Hand Job"

Season 9 Episode 14  

3/5/02

Teleplay by Matt Olmstead

Story by Bill Clark & Matt Olmstead

Directed by Tawnia McKiernan

 

Outstanding!  This one really moved. Read the summary; it's worth re-living.

 

Summary

HAND JOB: Connie and Rita are investigating what is reported in as the

crucifixion of a stripper and her boyfriend.  When they get to the scene,

they don't find exactly that, but something close:  A woman and her boyfriend

have had their hands nailed to tables and the woman, Laurie, has been shot in

the head.

    ESU has been called to free Dennis, the boyfriend, who is gasping in

pain. Connie and Rita get from him this: two Russian guys from the club where

Laurie worked were trying to open her safe. They nailed him to the table

first, but she wouldn't talk, so they nailed her. Still, she refused to give

up the combination. Finally, they stole the entire safe and, as they were

leaving, shot her and fired a shot that just missed him.

     When ESU arrives with bolt cutters to hack off the tops of the nails and

free Dennis, Rita beats a hasty retreat. Dennis utters a wail that rattles

the windows.

     Tony can't quite figure out Dennis' story. Why, he wonders, wasn't

Dennis shot? Seems awfully lucky that Dennis' hands weren't seriously injured

either. He tells Connie and Rita to talk to the club owner.

    The owner arrives looking as if he spent all day in bed. A dirty bed.

He's Russian, which fits the story Dennis told. He's also leering at the

detectives constantly and offering very little information. He admits a few

family members work for him but swears they'd never do anything like that to

his strippers. Connie threatens to have the health department, vice and

anyone else she can find on the city payroll come harass him if he doesn't

cooperate. He says again he's heard nothing, but he agrees to ask around.

     After that interview, Tony tells the detectives that the medical

examiner's report shows the wounds to Laurie's hands were post-mortem,

meaning she'd been shot before she was nailed to the table.  He's also

discovered that Dennis gave his wife as next of kin for notification at the

hospital. Wife?

     Connie and Rita go see the wife, Bettyann, while Dennis is still in the

hospital. She's half-a-junkie and pretty whacked out, but lets them in the

door. She doesn't say too much until Connie points out how nice she and Rita

are being by overlooking the substances she has in her apartment.  Bettyann

explains that Laurie and Dennis were an item but that she didn't do much

about it.  She needs Dennis' money. She says he gets it from being a DJ at

clubs and parties and that he's an apprentice for a real job at a piercing

parlor.  She's proud of her husband's work: she shows off her nipple rings

and, before Connie stops her, starts to show how Dennis pierced something

below her bellybutton.

     Armed with the name of the piercing parlor, the detectives head off for

a visit with the owner, Foss.  Playing a hunch, Connie strikes gold. She asks

Foss, who limits his body hardware to the non-pierced type (what does that

tell ya?) if Dennis ever talked to him about how to pierce hands. Foss' eyes

grow wide. Connie tells him they've had a complaint from someone who got

their hand pierced. Foss tells them that yes, they'd talked about it, but he

told Dennis it was crazy and dangerous. Connie turns down Rita's invitation

to get some work done while they're there.

     Dennis, with his paws bound up in gauze, is hauled in to the station

house. Connie confronts him with what the ME said. He lies. She then

confronts him with the little piercing story and he lies again. But he's

getting nervous. Connie then tells him that if he doesn't give up his

accomplice,  he's going to take the hit for the murder and the robbery all by

himself. He starts to whine. Rita gets in his face, Connie gets a little

rough and then he coughs up the name Hank Grenda.  The story goes that he and

Hank set the robbery up. He showed Hank how to drive a nail through his hands

without damaging him seriously. This was supposed to get Laurie to give up

the combination, but it didn't.  Figuring that now Dennis has a nail in his

heart as well as two in his hands, Hank tries to get Dennis to talk the

combination out of Laurie.  Only thing is, Hank is no Mensa member and he

uses Dennis' name.  Laurie gets wise that this isn't a surprise robbery and

freaks out. Hank then freaks out and shoots her.  After that, Dennis comes up

with the bright idea for Hank to nail her hands to the table too, and fire a

missed shot near his head.

     Connie and Rita go to pick up Mr. Brilliant. He's behind a garage door

and there's an electric saw going in there. Connie and Rita draw their

weapons and enter. Hank is sawing through the safe. He looks up from his work

bewildered at these two armed police officers and utters this week's LOTW.

      Later we find that to no one's surprise, Hank has confessed everything.

 

GANGSTA BABIES:  Andy and John, Greg and Baldwin are investigating the

shooting death of a somewhat popular rap singer unfortunately nicknamed

Jinxy. Jinxy got blown away at his record release party.  Andy, clearly out

of his milieu, seems a little surprised that John J. knows who Jinxy was.

John J. explains that he went to the academy with a guy who grew up with

Jinxy.  This becomes important a few minutes later when Baldwin finds these

words printed on the party invitations: Security provided by the NYPD.

     The natural inclination for cops to protect their own kicks in but

leaves both Andy and John feeling a little sucker punched.  When they get

back to the squad they don't tell the Lt. about the cop angle.  Tony notes

this quietly: he already knows, and asks about it. John J. and Andy seem a

little surprised.  Then Tony drops the small bomb that a cop named Marcus

Hodges is waiting in the coffee room to talk to them.  This is John J.'s

academy pal.

     Marcus and John J. exchange a warm greeting.  Marcus then tells him that

he didn't see anything. He says he's really nervous because he got a bunch of

his friends from the job to work with him that night without permission from

the brass. He says that none of them saw anything, but says he heard another

rapper named Fury did it. Seems Fury and Jinxy had one of those rap wars

going on.

     Later, Jinxy's brother Adrian is brought in. He's totally into the

hard-ass rapper thing and is making a major asshole of himself.  He says he

saw nothing and has heard nothing. but it's clear that he'd rather continue

the rap war.

     He tells them that he and his brother had a major problem with Fury,

whom he refers to as Furry.  This horrible, dreadful, murder-provoking

problem is that Furry is nothing but a wannabe from the suburbs, man, and he

was (can you believe the nerve?) trying to act hard! He was copying Jinxy,

man!  (As if Jinxy invented this hard street gansta thing... of course.)

Anyhoo, in an effort to shame Furry, they stretched out a poster of him at

one of Jinxy's gigs which showed him in a previous life as part of a

candy-ass boy band. It's easy to see why Furry would be motivated to murder.

     Andy tries to reach out to Adrian as an adult and prevent further

violence by bringing up Adrian's kids. That seems to register and Adrian says

he'll lay low if Andy promises to catch the guy who killed his brother. Andy

does, but tells him it may not happen overnight.

    Later, John J. vouches for Marcus with the boss, prompting concern from

Andy.

      Greg and Baldwin, meanwhile, are out rounding up Fury, who's real name

is Derek Glass.  He's hardly a fury-looking type, sort of small and thin, but

he's got tons of attitude.  Every time Baldwin speaks to him, little Fury

responds with a taunting rap that begins "Black po-leece-man" and ends with

the black po-leece-man doing horrible things to members of his own race. The

interview ends when Tony interrupts to say Fury's lawyer is on his way. Fury

is released but he and Baldwin have a bit of dust up first. 

     John J. and Andy have gone to talk to the other cops who were at the

party with Marcus.  One of them tells them that he heard the shots, he turned

around saw Marcus standing by the body. Then he saw Marcus and Adrian running

after Fury. 

     Back with Marcus, Andy and John J. try to get more information. Andy

gets involved. He's pissed off that if Marcus is lying he's going to take

John J. down, too.  Marcus is at a cross roads: side with his home boys or

side with his brethren in blue. He chooses blue and tells that he did saw

Fury run away with a gun in his hand.

     Andy and John J. decide to go pick up Fury on weapons charges. They

stake him out with Greg and Baldwin.  Before they can grab him another car

with tinted windows gets in the way.  Soon, shots come blasting out of the

car and Fury falls to the pavement.  Andy and John J. pursue the car as it

speeds away. It's not a long chase; the car slams into a taxi.  Andy and John

J. get out and haul Adrian and his pals out of the car and cuff them.

    Back on the pavement, Fury is reduced to from a bogus hard-ass to a

heaving, sobbing pool of blood and regret.  Baldwin is holding his hand as he

cries out his mother's name and where she lives. Baldwin tells him to hang

on, but Fury doesn't make it.

     The heat is off Marcus now, and he shows up to apologize to John J. He

and John J. part friends.

 

THE REPLACEMENT: Dave Moore's adventures in PAA-land continue with Dave

dancing on everyone's last nerve.  He starts the day by interrupting Connie's

work for some advice about a story he's putting together. He rolls up

unceremoniously to her desk and tells her she's working the case of a naked,

dead, raped supermodel who has been found with the letter B branded into her

forehead but is this first time? No, just last week, she had another dead

supermodel with the letter L burned into her forehead. Thrilled with his own

genius, he rattles off a series of questions about how she handles the case.

Connie gives him a bored look and tells him she'd do nothing because a task

force would take over a case like that.  Like any good bad writer he goes

with this. He tells her the supermodel is her sister! Now what would she do.

Increasingly annoyed, Connie tells him again that a task force would take the

case. Frustrated, he asks her to just pretend. She does. She tells him she'd

go to her boss, throw in her shield and tell him she's working the case on

her own. Dave is near orgasm with this new twist in his story. Connie

continues by saying she'd go find the ring she's been saving that allows her

to travel through time and adopt any identity she needs. Dave's hopes go limp

and Connie orders him back to work.

     But Dave is a healthy boy. He's aroused again almost immediately when he

hears that Connie and Rita are off to investigate two people who've been

crucified.  His ears stand at attention all day as he listens for every

detail: the victim is a stripper! There are Russians involved! My God, he

seems to be thinking, I've hit the mother lode. He begs for details but gets

the brush off.  He furtively taps out notes on his computer. He eyeballs

everyone and even seems interested in the Jinxy murder since it seems there

may be cops involved.  Ah, but Dave forgets where he is; he's surrounded by

professional observers who have a penchant for keeping things secret.

      Tony, for one, has been keeping an eye on him all day. When he gets a

minute alone in the squad with Dave he wanders over to Dave's desk and

amiably perches on the corner of it.  He starts a friendly conversation that

draws Dave right in and then delivers a verbal smack that would make any

normal person reel.  Dave, however, is mindless.

   Tony tells him to shut off the computer and cell phone and do his job

without bothering the detectives, period, end of story. Literally. 

     The final blow comes for Dave when much to everyone's shock and

surprise, P. John walks in.

     Mouths drop. Three weeks in Africa, wasn't it? Everyone wants to know

what he's doing there.  PJ, who's looking a little shell-shocked but hasn't

forgotten his manners, stands before them with a large box of gifts for

everyone and says he doesn't really want to talk about it.  Of course, he's

dealing with people who are used to getting details out of reluctant

witnesses. He weaves a tale that only he can tell. It ends with them being

forced to come home. John adds, with a special nod to Andy, that he and Ray

made it back in two pieces and still speaking to each other.

    Tony gets him alone for a moment to ask when he can come back to work. PJ

says he'll come back tomorrow. Tony owes him one.

 

THE HUSBAND: The saga of Don continues when Rita's lawyer Leslie shows up for

a chat. Don is now contesting the divorce. Rita finds out he wants to go to

trial.  She's informed that the whole thing could take up to two years to

work out and that it's going to cost her at least 10-grand. She seems to be

in it for the long haul.

 

BALDWIN AND VAL: Baldwin follows Valerie into the hallway after she chats

with the squad about picking up Fury.  He asks her how she's doing. She says

she's much better and appears to be.  She says she's finally getting her head

back on straight about work. Baldwin says that's good. She starts to leave

and then stop and asks if they're OK. Baldwin says they are. She suggests

they get together when she's had a chance to catch up. He agrees.

 

ANDY AND CONNIE: These two have a moment alone in the squad room at the end

of the day and Connie seems a bit nervous. She gets up from her desk to walk

away from the tension and Andy pops out with a dinner invitation. Seems

Theo's got a play date until 8pm. Connie seems surprised but agrees to go.

     That evening, they're seated at their booth in their diner (Konnie's

Koffee Kup), and they have another one of those talks.  Andy tells her Theo

wants to see her. She asks him point blank what it is he, Andy, wants.  He

tells her that he's never been able to keep anything good in his life for

long and that he just wants to hang on to his job and Theo.  She tells him

that his life doesn't have to be so narrow.  He finally admits that he wants

her in his and Theo's lives. She says OK, and they agree to leave it at that

and not label it anything. She says that whatever it is they have, it's

working. He seems to agree. It's clear from his face that he thinks she's

pretty cool.

 

Review

HAND JOB:  The humor in this story is what made it work so well for me.

First, you have the basic criminal stupidity of Hank and Dennis:  don't

crooks ever watch Forensic Files?? Or Medical Detectives?? Did they really

think they can get away with hammering that chick's hands after she was dead?

Anyway, the additional humor came from Dave and his obsession with the gory

details.

     Of course, it wasn't a genuine crucifixion, and that's another clever

little point in this script.  You know how everyone is always blasting that

evil thing known as "the media" for making stuff up?  Well, sometimes they go

overboard--there's no denying it--but they're hardly the only guilty parties. 
Regular folks who wear badges do the same thing: someone in uniform reported it as a crucifixion,
after all, and yeah, any sleazy moron who can't see through the gore to the

facts might hang on to that real hard.   (Hell, even people at

alt.tv.nypd-blue heard the word "crucifixion" in the previews of last week's

show and went nuts! And I guess it was in the previews for a reason, too. ) 

I loved that small but very creative bit of writing. Sort of catches you with

your mouth open and your tongue hanging out, doesn't it?

 

     I've been waiting some weeks now to see Jacqueline Obradors spark it up

a bit and breathe some life into Rita for us. Sadly for her (and for us), she

hasn't had the benefit of much character development to work with.  That line

outside the piercing shop that was supposed to be funny was almost entirely

lost in her delivery (not to mention her looking at Connie as if she expected

some response other than what Connie said), and that's sad. But in another

instance tonight, she did quite well. Despite the obviously thin drawing of

this Rita person, Jacqueline did a scene that I thought stood out from all

the rest of her stuff. It was when she got in Dennis' face. The finger

snapping bit was great.  And after comparing her doing her Mini Mouse

impersonation in the "previously" sequence to her shouting at Dennis, it

gives me hope that she's trying to bring that voice down into a more

believable range. 

   Now, if we can only give her some identity away from Don and Connie (and

help her develop the delivery of a funny line now and then).  So far, all

she's been is Connie's sidekick and Don's troubled, abused, soon-to-be-ex

wife.

 

     Charlotte Ross continues to amaze.  Evidence of her ability: the scene

with Dave where she makes up that story is something I believe wholeheartedly

is a scene that pre-Charlotte would have gone to Dennis Franz. Who else could

have done that? Only Dennis/Andy.  Clark? Uh-uh. Simone?  Never. Kelly? Not.

Sorenson....maybe, but he'd probably have skipped the fun part when you draw

the guy like you're playing along. 

 

GANGSTA BABIES:  I have to admit that I truly enjoyed the underlying message

of this story. Memo to ganstas: get over yabadselves.  It's bittersweet,

actually. Here are these poor young fools getting all pissed off at things

that 12-year-old girls argue over (She's copying me!) but they are totally

incapable of grabbing the smallest shred of self-esteem that carries most

schoolgirls beyond that crap by the time they reach adulthood. And when these

underdeveloped boys who affirm their self-loathing with their enormous

displays of "manliness" and "power" get into conflict, they slaughter each

other. They're playing childhood games with grown-up toys, and that's tragic.

 I think sometimes that people who have grown up with absolutely perverted

values, or no values at all --as these guys surely must have --they just make

up their own set.

    Sorry to get all philosophical here, but this story really hit a few

nails.  I mean, these rappers were playing childish games. When was the last

time you thought you could really, seriously piss someone off by calling them

a name like Furry? Or hanging up a derogatory picture of them? You were

probably between 9 and say, 16. And when was the last time you felt really,

seriously pissed off at someone for doing that to you?  Here are some guys

clearly beyond puberty who have never gotten over that kid stuff.  And to

make the point even more clear, they create this Marcus character who is

caught between the two worlds. He's torn between staying with his boys and

standing up and being the man he really is.  Who knows what made the

difference in Marcus' life way back when, but you can see that for him it's

still a struggle. He finally decides to do the right thing.   And then you

have Baldwin in the mix. He made his decision a long time ago to be a grown

up, but when face to face with those who didn't, he gets a bag a crap thrown

in his face for it. His own temptation to beat the guy is barely contained. 

Baldwin knows what's real--he tells Fury how screwed up his life is--but he's

powerless to make it meaningful to Fury and almost resorts to violence to get

his point across. I don't think even Baldwin realized in that moment how much

further away his own violent act would have pushed Fury.

    That realization comes to Baldwin later when all of Fury's folly ends in

his own stupid death.  On the street in a pool of blood, Fury becomes Derek

again, his mother's son, and it's just too damn late.  Now he and Jinxy are

equally dead. Powerful story.

     The only criticism I have, and it's so minor, is that I thought Marcus'

struggle could have been illuminated a little more. In his final conversation

with John J. it might have been a little deeper if he'd have acknowledged

this conflict he faces (and obviously has been facing all his life) and then

say how he's staying on the job to make up for it.  The thing about John J.

trusting him and going out on a limb for him could have been a little more

powerful with the addition of something like that. As it was, Marcus was a

man John J. saw as someone worth standing up for. Add a little more of

Marcus' struggle (with maybe one more line), and John J. would have been

talking to someone worth standing up beside. 

    

THE REPLACEMENT:  Great. Just great. One of the many great things I can say

about this is that it ended at just the right time. We didn't *lose* any Bill

Brochtrup, we gained some!   Not knowing he was going to be in this episode

was fantastic--I was as shocked at the squad to see him and as happy.  

     Dave was a great side story, but any more of that and it would have

gotten really old.  To me, this was perfectly timed.  And John's story was

really funny.  Is there any doubt Bill Brochtrup can do this?  Absolutely

not.  His delivery of that speech was like hitting a home run out of the

park.  I'm going to hate it if he's muzzled again. I think it just might have

been the single best scene in the entire show.

    Here's one of the small things that makes the show so good:  Having

gifts, and not just having gifts, but wrapping those gifts so perfectly.  Who

else but PJ could rival Martha Stewart in the gift-wrap department?  No one

mentioned it, it wasn't a big deal, but there it was, so perfectly in tune

with John Irvin.  I'm so pleased we got to enjoy this.

     I'm also happy with the interaction of everyone else with Dave.  I kept

expecting Andy to be the one who teed off on this mope, but it wasn't.  That

was nice.  Rather than following the expected path--the thing that, frankly,

any wannabe NYPD Blue writer very probably would have chosen--they handed

this off to others. Connie took a good swat at him (as mentioned above), and

then Tony delivers the final blow. That scene was great, too.  You all know I

love Esai--I think he's a fantastic actor totally on par with Dennis Franz

and Gordon Clapp (although we haven't gotten to see the full range of his

talent on Blue yet)--and I enjoyed seeing him playing with Dave, slapping the

poor guy around a little.

    A note about Dave, too. Dan Bucatinsky, who played Dave, did a super job

here. You can tell this guy is no stranger to Hollyweird. (Though I do wonder

if wannabe writers in NYC are this smarmy...  sure they are on the Left

Coast, but aren't New York hacks a little more cool in their general

smarminess? I dunno, less needy? Oh, well, maybe I've been watching too much

TV.)  It's safe to say that none of Our Writers on the Blue staff, and

certainly not Bochco and Milch, ever acted this way. Surely not! But I bet

they get scripts all the time featuring naked, sex-crimed supermodels with

letters branded into their foreheads.  (I know I sent them one...bastards

never wrote back, either.)

      AnywayS, this story was outstanding on all counts. Bravo!

 

THE HUSBAND:  Read above on Jacqueline.  I'm still betting This Don gets in

some sort of scrape with the law just like That Don did.  This time, though,

I'm also betting Rita doesn't try to hide him in some upstate town with a

funny name and then take off to do Headline News.

 

BALDWIN AND VAL: So now I'm asking, what was the point of the whole

miscarriage story?  All's well with them and that's it? 

    I'm saying this for the record:  There are two choices, the way I see it.

OK, well, three.

   Choice 1) If Baldwin doesn't dump this chick immediately, the writers are

running the very serious risk of having him be totally untrue to his

character. Here's a man who, as we saw so beautifully during this episode,

struggled hard choices in his life and stands up against a lot of bozos who

keep shoving that "us and them" theory in his face. That says to me that he's

brave and smart.  Now his girlfriend comes along, doesn't tell him squat

about the miscarriage until it's all said and done, takes off for a few days

leaving him to suffer alone (all due props to Greg), and then upon her return

asks him nothing, nada, zero, zilch about how HE is coping with the loss. 

What does she ask him? "Are we OK?"  If he's the man I think he is, he's

going to tell her "No, as a matter of fact, I'm done with your self-obsessed

ways, baby. You can doo-wop with somebody else now."  

    Choice 2) Valerie herself sees the error of her ways and knocks down some

of those tiring, boring, stupid walls she's got built up. She grows up a

little from this experience (and she hinted every so slightly at this

tonight, but behaved like the old block of wood we used to know). She has a

major self-discovering and becomes someone worthy of a man with that much

courage and intelligence.

    Choice 3) The other thing that I haven't thought of that will somehow

make this OK.

     Because to go back to square one with these two is to put us all to

sleep.  Find something for this woman to do or have her do nothing at all. 

 

ANDY AND CONNIE:  I think we're getting really close to the red zone on this

story. Tonight it began taking on the tone of writers who still aren't sure

what they want to do.  Last week, we had The Connie Angst: that is, this can

never work because all she wants is to be a mother to Theo.  This week, we

get The Andy Angst: that this can never work because he's had too much loss

in his life and is trying to keep a low profile with the gods who seem to

enjoy toying with him.  And we end up exactly no where.  We've learned

nothing new:  we know from previous conversations that they want to "be in

each others lives," but we still don't know what that means. 

   The only thing we've learned is this: Connie really likes that coffee

shop.

    And when Connie said, "Whatever this is or isn't it works. Don't you

think?" I said aloud, "NO."  If they get these two together, it's only going

to end badly, I'm tellin' ya. Hell, she was tense alone in the squad room

with him after the last coffee shop outing.... ohfuggedit.

 

QUICK HITS:

*When Connie said to Rita as Rita was heading off to chat with her lawyer,

"I'll get the boss," it made me wonder which of them really *will*  get the

boss. 

 

*This guy Dave...did you see the gleam in his eye when it seemed to dawn on

him that using real cop stories instead of his made up ones might actually

sell a script? He could go on and create NYPD Blue. Surely it doesn't exist

in their world.

 

*Question for all the medical examiners out there: Would there be blood on

Laurie's hand if she was hammered into the table post-mortem?  There was

blood on her hand in the scene. I thought the dead don't bleed.

 

*Coolest shot of the show:  Can't remember which act it was, but it's an

outside shot moving around behind the police cars and then sweeping into the

coffee room as John J. and Andy are entering with Marcus.  It's not the

shaky-cam thing, thank God, but it was really cool.

 

*Another great Connie line:  "Where's Hank?"  I've said that a time or two

myself, but I saw him tonight.  It was Hank who locked up Hank.  Welcome

back, Hank!

 

*Dave's main problem: he was wearing black and his notebook was red.

 

*Why didn't the EMS guys give a painkiller to the guy who was nailed to the

table? I'd like to think that if I just happen to get my hands nailed to a

table on my trip to NYC later this year that someone would at least give me a

Demerol or something before taking the bolt cutters to the nails. 

 

*We never did find out what was in Laurie's safe that was so worth all that

trouble.

 

*Funny how the slimy record company guy used a phrase made famous by our

detectives: "I will absolutely get behind that."

 

*Jinxy lived up to his name, huh. Fury didn't. (Well, he may live up to Furry

now.)

 

*Little Louie and the Shoeshiners? O.M.G.

 

*Nice to see Andy feed the fish. He hasn't done that since Danny started on

the two years ago, so he's lucky none of them was giving him the one-eye. 

Actually, this made me think of his "keep your tank clean" speech and how

glad I was not to have to hear it again. This time, he was just giving

straight up advice.

 

*Was it a little cheap to have John J. just mentioning that he's got a pal

from the academy who knows this rapper?  Maybe have John discover it later so

it doesn't seem like such an obvious set up for the audience.

 

CAST:  (Once again can't get to imdb for research...so it's just a list

tonight.)

Steven Daniel as Adrain Upchurch, Robb Sklyer as Marty the record guy,

Phillip Angelotti as the Uniform, Dan Bucatinksy as Dave Moore, James Lesure

as Marcus Hodges, Edoardo Ballerini as Dennis Clancy, Rick Pasqualone as

Uniform 2, Allan Kolman as Josef the Russian, Patrick Dancy as Derek Glass,

Larry Bates as Terence King, Cyia Batten as Bettyanne, Brett Wagner as Foss

Miller, Randy Flager as Hank Grenda, Nike Doukas as Leslie Walden, Henry

Murph as Hank!, Billy Concha as Officer Miller, Mike Echols as Officer

Echols.

 

LINES OF THE WEEK:

Phone John after relating his horror story: "Boo Hoo Hoo, right? Forget all

that.."  (Brochtrup's perfect delivery made this one.)

 

Hank Grenda as he's sawing open the stolen safe that he murdered a woman to

get and two detectives enter with guns drawn:  "Was I making too much noise?"

 

NEXT WEEK:  Don and his mistress reappear. 

 

Don't be a stranger--

Amanda Wilson